DPS Software release Oyez integration to further expand forms offering

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20 November 2014


are pleased to announce their collaboration with Oyez Professional Services whose forms are now integrated into DPS’s case management software. The compatibility between the two software solutions means that any OyezForms user can access their forms straight from DPS’s Outlook Office. These forms are then automatically populated with the corresponding information stored within DPS.

For existing DPS users, the integration allows them access to a virtually unlimited forms library, continually updated and enriched with new functionalities such as automatic calculations and expandable fields, for any area of law, no matter how niche and uncommon. The OyezForms are an addition to the existing ones already provided within DPS workflows.

Once completed, the OyezForms available within DPS can also be exported as PDF documents should the user need them outside the system.

The cost of completing forms may seem a minor one, however it is an expense with a real impact on efficiency and productivity, especially for legal businesses embracing new pricing models such as fixed fees. The 2000 + forms provided by Oyez come with free support, schedulable updates and auxiliary databases.

“The purpose of this collaboration is the faster completion of forms- a time-consuming task that solicitors must undertake on a daily basis. Therefore, the mere automation and simplification of this task could save a law firm a considerable amount of time and both us and Oyez strive to make this an attainable goal for our clients. The integration was the natural result of understanding that we have a common objective,” explains Scott Ridley, the technical director of DPS Software.

 



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