DAS highlights importance of access to justice following Competition Commission review

Print This Post

23 December 2013


Leading legal expenses insurer DAS broadly welcomes the Competition Commission provisional findings on the private motor market but urges caution on how it now progresses.

Richard Harris, head of claims at DAS UK Group, said: “We have read the Competition Commission investigation with interest and intend to submit responses to some of the remedies that are proposed within it. The overarching theme of our responses will be that access to justice is not compromised in the pursuit of reducing premiums.

“We acknowledge that the commission has put the customer at the heart of its proposals and we would seek assurance that there are no unintended consequences as a result of the remedies.

“The law is in place to protect individuals and the industry must be careful to ensure these rights for individuals are not compromised in an attempt to lower motor premiums across the market as a whole. These premiums are influenced by many other factors that are well within the control of general insurers.

“We particularly welcome the Competition Commission proposals to increase the awareness of consumer’s legal rights following an accident. These proposals complement the findings of the Financial Conduct Authority in its thematic review of motor legal expenses insurance (MLEI) – particularly the need to increase customer understanding of the product.

“DAS has already undertaken a significant amount of work to improve how we highlight this to our customers in our literature and processes and we will continue to work on improving this understanding.”

For add-ons, DAS wants much greater transparency of the value for money these products can offer customers.

Richard Harris added: “Policyholders should be able to compare and understand on what basis those add-ons, especially motor legal expenses, operate. Whilst the basic features of MLEI are common to most products, individual policies can differ greatly.

“An example is the inclusion in some policies of damaged-based agreements (DBAs) that can see customers surrender up to 25% of any damages they receive after being injured in a non-fault accident.”



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

The ethics of the SRA’s social media warning notice

Mena Ruparel

Social media portals are regularly used by firms and those who work for law firms in both professional and personal capacities. Their informal nature and the fast pace of use makes it all too easy for regulated people to get carried away with online discussions or comments which can fall foul of the regulator. This is more likely to happen on social media platforms as these are virtual, accessed in the solicitor’s own time and space. It can be easy to forget that solicitors are regulated just the same at 11pm on their home computer as they are at 3pm in the office or at court.

September 15th, 2017