Cyber Security Essentials seminars from DPS

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18 August 2016


CYBER SECURITY SEMINAR

Cyber Security seminars from DPS

90% of corporations have experienced a cyber security breach in the last year. According to PwC’s 2015 Annual Law Firms’ Survey, 62% of law firms reported that they were the victims of a security incident, up from 45% in 2014.

Last year, almost half of cyber-attacks worldwide, namely 43%, were against small and medium-size businesses with less than 250 workers. It is clear that cyber-attacks affect law firms of all sizes.

DPS are an ISO 270001 accredited business and protect the data of over 160 legal businesses through their dpscloud hosting solution. During a six month interval, DPS spam filters have stopped approximately 230,891 email viruses in their tracks. That is an average of 38,481 email viruses per month. If you are managing a practice, there hasn’t been a better time to increase your defences than now.

The security seminar diary dates are set out below:

The seminars will be delivered by DPS’s information security manager, Emma Spenwyn, who is a certified lead auditor for information security and whose expertise has enabled DPS to drive cyber security awareness in the legal sector.

The aim of these seminars will be to broaden the attendees’ knowledge on cyber security by addressing a number of questions such as:

  1. What is cyber threat
  2. What are the most recent types of scams
  3. How to avoid a cyber security disaster
  4. How to alert your staff to the threat

Early booking using the web link at http://www.dpssoftware.co.uk/events/  is recommended. The seminar is accredited with 2 CPD points for Attendees.

For more information about DPS, please visit their websites http://www.dpssoftware.co.uk/ and http://www.dpscloud.com



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