CPD training – 7 ways to increase profit from residential conveyancing

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6 February 2014


Half-day CPD Training Course London, 6th March 2014

With many Solicitors needing to improve their profit margins from residential conveyancing, ETSOS, the country’s leading property search supermarket, is pleased to announce a collaboration with fee improvement specialists Legal Mentors to deliver a CPD Training Course in London on Thursday, 6th March 2014 for all Partners, Department Heads and Solicitors involved in residential conveyancing.

With a choice of attending either the morning or afternoon session the Course will qualify for 3 hours CPD and show you how your firm can improve the profitability of your conveyancing work and attract more instructions:

  • how to design a process for handling enquiries to improve conversion rates
  • how to improve client satisfaction in conveyancing
  • how to attract conveyancing work on better margins
  • how and when it is quite legitimate to charge more based on the circumstances of the client

 

The Course will be held at 16 Park Crescent, London, W1B 1AH (directions here) and includes an opportunity to network with your fellow professionals between the morning and afternoon Courses over a buffet lunch.

To book your place on this half-day Course please complete the booking form here or contact David Opie at ETSOS on 01524 220001 for more information.

 

 



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