Core Legal member, IRN Research, publishes market briefing on personal injury – discounted price at Legalex 2014

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12 May 2014


The UK Personal Injury Market Briefing is the third in a series of Legal Market Briefings from IRN Research and provides an overview of the UK personal injury and clinical negligence markets.

Usually priced at £105 (plus VAT), it is available to order on our Stand (L312) at Legalex 2014, ExCeL, 15th-16th May, for £65 (plus VAT). 

The largest players in the personal injury market, including some large law firms, claims management companies, and other providers are increasing their market share through acquisitions of other personal injury brands or, in some cases, through the purchase of personal injury caseloads from others. Many firms have left the sector largely because of the radical market changes introduced in April 2013. Some firms which relied heavily on referrals, or legal aid work, have either left the market, been acquired, or have had to change their business models.

Clinical negligence work, in particular, is expected to grow as more individuals consider carefully the quality of care given following more high profile stories about poor care at both NHS and private institutions.  Some personal injury firms will move into the clinical negligence sector to try and compensate for lost personal injury work following the April 2013 reforms. Others could diversify into areas such as industrial disease.

The briefing provides details of market size and trends; supply structure; key players; commentary on key issues impacting on the market, including the April 2013 reforms; associations.




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