Core Legal member, IRN Research, publishes its first legal market briefing on conveyancing

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4 November 2013


Core Legal member IRN Research is ramping up its market information services for the legal services industry with the publication of The UK Conveyancing Market Briefing 2013. This is the first in a series of annual Legal Market Briefings and it will be followed by briefings on personal injury, wills and probate, and family law markets in the next few months.

Between 2008 and 2012 the residential property market in the UK was relatively flat although there are now clear signs of recovery. The residential property market grew by 5.4% in 2012 and by 6.0% in the first six months of 2013 compared with the same period in 2012.

Between 2010 and 2012, the share of the conveyancing sector taken by the top 10 firms in England and Wales has doubled (measured by transactions at the Land Registry).  Overall, the number of solicitors firms involved in conveyancing continues to fall despite the slight upturn in the residential property market. Between 2010 and 2012, the number of firms involved in conveyancing in England and Wales fell by more than a quarter.

The UK Conveyancing Market Briefing 2013 is part of IRN Legal, an annual subscription service that includes the annual reports UK Legal Services Market and UK Legal Landscape (with 6-monthly updates), plus 4 annual Legal Market Briefings and a monthly e-news and statistical update on legal market trends.

For a free summary of the latest UK Legal Services Market report, email info@corelegal.net, and for further details about IRN Legal email dmort@irn-research.com.



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