Converge Technology Specialists starts 2016 with £1.5m of new contracts

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15 February 2016


PrintConverge Technology Specialists, the cloud provider for law firms, got off to a great start this year with £1.5m of new contracts on the back of 50% growth in 2015.

New clients for the Cheshire-based firm include Southport based serious injury specialists Fletchers Solicitors and Wilmslow flight delay and consumer rights specialist Bott & Co.

Converge Technology Specialists has seen revenues rise 50% in both 2014 and 2015 and is predicting another 50% revenue rise this year.

Managing director, Nigel Wright said “We are seeing a growing trend for law firms moving some or all of their IT to the cloud and we are positioning ourselves as the provider of choice.

“More law firms are choosing to go cloud first, when it comes to upgrades or network refreshes, in order to maximise productivity gains from greater flexibility, agile working and lower cost of ownership.

“In Q4 2015 we invested heavily in our datacentre infrastructure and are currently expanding into our third datacentre in the south of England in order to meet client demand. We have only scratched the surface of the increasing opportunity and plan to increase our technical team by another 12 staff this year.”



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