Commercial law specialist chooses Proclaim

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20 March 2014


City of London-based law firm, Carter Lemon Camerons LLP, is implementing Eclipse‘s

From its centrally-located premises in the City, Carter Lemon Camerons has an enviable reputation in real estate and commercial development, supporting investors from overseas and operators in the healthcare, social housing, church and charity fields. The practice also boasts a strong litigation team and a prestigious private client base.

Carter Lemon Camerons is implementing Eclipse’s Proclaim system as its core Practice Management solution throughout the firm.  Proclaim will provide a central and consistent platform for all matters, and the firm is also taking Proclaim’s integrated Lead Inception tools to provide seamless marketing, file opening, and on-going compliance with SRA regulations and Lexcel accreditation.

In addition to a data conversion from the firm’s incumbent financial software system, Carter Lemon Camerons is taking module which will provide increased efficiencies and complete management and analysis of its operations.

Justin Cumberlege, Partner at Cater Lemon Camerons, comments:

“To meet the increasing complexities of our clients’ transactions – many of whom are based overseas – a robust and flexible Practice Management solution is vital to maintain the value for money both our corporate and private clients require.  Proclaim will provide us with the consistency that our clients expect, while centralising all matters and financial data in one core desktop solution.  The benefits of an increase in efficiency will pass to our clients.”

 



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