Clio releases document sub-foldering feature

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19 February 2015


Clio200By Maggie Nyunt

In line with the company’s ethos of constant improvement, Clio has kicked off 2015 with a new and comprehensive offering for document management.

Clio, a pioneer in legal practice management software, boasts an EU server (located near their European headquarters in Dublin), meaning that documents housed in the system are compliant with privacy regulations in the UK. On top of that, Clio further secures your data with SSL encryption and multiple backups each day.

Clio has always featured unlimited document storage and now offers the ability for firms to organise their files in folders by client and case, with further sub-foldering options available as well. The implementation of the new foldering features has been a real game changer for users, who may have previously turned to Google Drive or Dropbox (both of which integrate with Clio).

clio

The system incorporates full versioning capability, allowing your firm to track revisions, store multiple versions of a document, and view an audit trail of when these changes were made.

The new improvements to Clio’s document system were a direct result of feedback from customers. The company prides itself on keeping a line of communication open between the front and back of house, allowing them to implement real customer suggestions into the development of the product.

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