Clio Free Webinar: Legal Artificial Intelligence

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23 February 2016


Clio 200Clio, the world’s leading cloud-based legal practice management system, and Ross Intelligence, creators of the world’s first digital attorney, come together to discuss one of the most topical areas in the legal technology sector, artificial intelligence (AI).

When it comes to predictions about  artificial intelligence and legal services, much of the press coverage seems to be dedicated to a more Terminator-style villain than friendly robot assistant.

Predictions include the total replacement of junior lawyers with computers and the use of robots instead of judges. How serious of a risk do emerging artificial intelligence law services pose to legal professionals?

Join Clio’s Lawyer-in-Residence, Joshua Lennon, and ROSS Intelligence cofounders Andrew Arruda (CEO) and Jimoh Ovbiagele (CTO) to discuss the rise of artificial intelligence, big data, and the impact of this technology on lawyers.

In this free, hour-long webinar, they’ll explore

  • What is classified as artificial intelligence (AI)
  • How legal professionals can use AI
  • What legal AI tools are in development
  • How lawyers can get started with AI

RSVP now for Legal Artificial Intelligence: Replacing or Helping Lawyers?, taking place on Tuesday 23rd February at 7pm GMT.

 



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