Clio celebrates one year in Dublin

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24 November 2014


Clio’s #teamDublin marked a year of presence in the EU on November 11th. In classic Clio form, they celebrated the success a week early, with a visit from Clio’s Co-founders, Jack Newton and Rian Gauvreau, to coincide with Dublin’s Web Summit.

I (Maggie Nyunt, support specialist at the Dubin HQ) had the pleasure of sitting down to dinner, drinks, and strategic planning with Jack and Rian, along with George Psiharis, the vice president of business development at Clio; Rory Fitzpatrick, founding member of the Dublin office; and Derek Fitzpatrick, business development manager in the EU.

Fresh from exhibiting at the Web Summit, and from a meeting with the Law Society of the UK the day before, they made a few things very clear:

They are serious about European expansion. Last year, Clio launched an EU counterpart to their cloud-based practice management system. The software, which boasts 40,000+ subscribers in North America, is now available to European customers, with full compliance to data privacy regulations.

Although Clio already holds the spot for the number one practice management solution in the States, Clio remains committed to achieving this sort of stand-out success in Europe as well.

For this reason, they have created a team dedicated to finding any differences in practice management style, and tailoring the software to address the needs European law firms.

We offer a full suite of best practice guideline documents specifically for our UK users which enables them to operate within SRA requirements.

Part of the attraction of cloud-based software is the fluidity of it. There is no new software to install, there are no updates to download, and you will never need to purchase the latest version. When our Developers make changes, they are automatically delivered to our Users.

Communication is key.  Not many support agents get the chance for a roundtable discussion with their company’s co-founders, but this is just part of the beauty of start-ups. Jack and Rian have made it very clear that free-flowing dialogue is a must in this business, from their stance on “reply to all” emails (why not?), to the internal systems that they have set up for analyzing user feedback.

In the case of the EU, it is not uncommon for user feedback delivered to the support team to go straight to the vice president. We record every suggestion, and in turn, these ideas are reviewed by our product development team.

Training is hands-on, unlimited, and free. As a start-up branch of a start-up company, we’ve basically been given carte blache when it comes to training. Between on-site office visits, demonstrations via screenshare, and a 17-hour support line, Clio is dedicated to answering any questions that you may have about the product.

We’ve adapted our process in the EU to offer a customized training experience upon signup, courtesy of Rory Fitzpatrick, our Onboarding Specialist and veteran Dublin office member.

Between the quality of the software itself, and the quality of the onboarding experience, we’ve found that, characteristically, our European users have been very quick to adopt Clio.

We’re really eager to talk about Clio, showcase its features, and hear your thoughts on it!

If you’re interested in learning more, please feel free to sign up for a free trial here: http://www.goclio.eu/sign-up/ and you’ll be hearing from me, Rory, or Derek shortly.



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