Certainty, the National Will Register, grows to match diverse nature of wills and probate

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9 April 2013


To appreciate the full impact of Certainty on Wills & Probate in the UK it is useful to consider the diversity of those who use, reference and recommend the services. All have an interest in the various stages of Wills & Probate and agree that Certainty is an essential tool to protect relevant parties and stakeholders:

  • Educators and advisors to Wills & Probate practitioners such as Gill Steel and Professor Lesley King
  • Professional Indemnity providers (90% recommend Certainty)
  • Compliance, risk management, OFR and COLP advisors
  • Lexis Nexis and Practical Law Company – those issuing practice notes to practitioners
  • Legal networks including LawNet, Bold Legal Group and regional law societies
  • Probate Researchers such as Title Research and Fraser & Fraser
  • Search service providers such as TM Group and Quantus
  • National Awareness bodies such as Dying Matters
  • UK Charities such as Macmillan Cancer Care, Will Aid, Alzheimer’s Society, Remember a Charity, PDSA
  • Public Advice bodies such as Citizens Advice Bureaux
  • National Association of Funeral Directors
  • Law firms – thousands of practitioners around the country use Certainty to protect business and clients.

When surveyed 80% of solicitors stated that they preferred a voluntary National Will Register, in favour of a compulsory scheme to preserve testamentary freedom. Certainty is a proven process to help law firms and others protect their business and clients.



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