CaseCheck’s Spring Case Law Digest eBook now available

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23 May 2013


As part of CaseCheck’s continuing commitment to help professionals keep ahead of legal developments in the courts, the Spring edition of the Case Law Digest eBook is now available to download.

The latest edition of the Case Law Digest contains just under 200 summaries of judgments uploaded onto the CaseCheck database from January to April this year, free to download by all subscribers.

Consolidated into one easily searched document, including an introductory summary of some of the most notable judgments contained in the Digest, it makes legal research of the most recently delivered judgments easier. Organised into twenty-nine areas of procedural and substantive law, it covers a wide range of legal issues, from approaches to costs, to the right to manifest belief at work through to the court’s discretion to review UK involvement in drone strikes conducted by the US.

An extract of the 2012 annual Digest can be viewed here.

Freely available to all subscribers, this most recent edition of the Digest is easy to navigate, printable and available across a wide range of devices. Subscribe today to download your free eBook and access a range of time saving features, including CPD recorder, access to the search function and a personalised virtual library.



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