Capturing time on the go: Eclipse announces mobile time-recording application

Print This Post

16 November 2012


Eclipse Legal Systems, the sector’s largest independent software solutions provider, has announced the impending release of a mobile time-recording application.

The application – currently codenamed MyTime – will provide mobile time recording for users of Eclipse’s Proclaim case and practice management solutions. MyTime is designed to cater for all popular devices including Apple (iOS), Android, Blackberry and Windows Mobile.

A real-time (or on-demand/‘push’) sync means that recorded time elements can be posted to the relevant Proclaim area for analysis and confirmation (MyTime will also include a client and matter look-up feature). All time and narrative entries will update the relevant matters, WIP and billing details across areas of the user’s own Proclaim solution.

Mick Thompson, technical director at Eclipse, says: “This is an important development, furthering our ethos of providing device-independent, mobile productivity applications to complement Proclaim. We have opted to design MyTime in-house, from scratch, to provide the very best fit for our users in terms of tapping in to Proclaim’s rich feature set.

“We are seeing more and more clients come to us requesting applications and features that require an ‘any time, any place’ architecture. Not only do these applications need to be platform-agnostic, but they need to be location-agnostic too. We feel that the type of remote access to core enterprise software feature sets that this application (and the forthcoming TouchPoint) offers is very much the future of legal IT solutions.”

 



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

Is it time solicitors started taking ethics training more seriously?

mena_ruparel

The requirement for solicitors to behave ethically in modern legal practice is more relevant than ever. Solicitors are still held in fairly high regard by the public, although that esteem is on the wane according to last year’s Trusted Professions poll by Ipsos Mori. Lawyers are less trusted than teachers and doctors but at least we prevail over accountants and bankers. We still hold a position of trust but we must work to hold that position. The current Solicitors Regulation Authority proposals to revise the Handbook are evidence that work still needs to be done.

June 21st, 2017