Birmingham law firm moves sites to support growth

Print This Post

18 January 2016


LLoyds_JacobsLaw_0030

Kulvinder Lall, relationship manager at Lloyds Bank Commercial Banking and Asead Yakoob, director at Jacobs Law Solicitors

A Birmingham solicitors firm has purchased a new premises in Hockley and created six new jobs with the support of a £180,000 loan from Lloyds Bank Commercial Banking.

Established in 2014, Jacobs Law Solicitors works with clients across the Midlands and specialises in commercial, immigration, family and criminal law.

After outgrowing its office on Corporation Street, the business approached Lloyds Bank to support the purchase of a larger premises. Spanning two floors, the new office has nine rooms, client-friendly meeting rooms and on-site parking giving the firm the capacity to increase its headcount from three to nine.

Asead Yakoob, director at Jacobs Law Solicitors, said: “Following the move to our new offices we are now a nine-strong team. We can proudly welcome our clients in for meetings and it’s great to have much more space and on-site parking.

“The support from Lloyds Bank has been essential in helping us to begin this phase of our expansion plans, and we can now look to growing our client base in line with our growing headcount.”

Kulvinder Lall, relationship manager at Lloyds Bank Commercial Banking, said: “Professional practices are an integral part of the region’s economic activity and as confidence in the sector continues to rise, firms like Jacobs Law Solicitors will look to expand.

“At Lloyds Bank we are committed to supporting ambitious management teams, which is why we’ve pledged to grow our net lending by at least £1billion to SMEs every year until the end of 2017.”



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Legal Futures Blog

McKenzie Friends – a storm in a teapot

Legal Futures Conference 2011Photo by Jonathan Goldberg

If the recent furore about McKenzie Friend Marketplace shows anything, it is that the profession remains acutely sensitive to the apparent threat of competition by unregulated entrants into the legal landscape. But for an outside observer, the whole McKenzie Friend debate remains curiously overblown: if not a storm in a teacup, a storm at least in a teapot. For all the characteristic sturm und drang of the Law Society’s response to last year’s senior judiciary consultation, there was pretty widespread agreement among most respondents that McKenzie Friends are here to stay.

April 28th, 2017