Bird & Lovibond chooses Eclipse Proclaim

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20 June 2014


Trood: “Proclaim will be fundamental to our success, providing a flexible single solution embraced by everyone at our 3 offices”

Bird & Lovibond Solicitors is implementing the from Eclipse Legal Systems.

Based in Middlesex with branches in Uxbridge, Ruislip and Greenford, Bird & Lovibond Solicitors is a growing multidisciplinary law firm with a proud tradition of providing excellent service to both private clients and commercial organisations.

The Proclaim Practice Management solution will be rolled out to all staff, ensuring a secure and consistent approach across all matters. Eclipse will conduct a full data migration from the incumbent system, allowing integrated firm-wide financial management toolsets to be utilised including the – boosting efficiency and providing detailed analysis of the firm’s operations.

Bird & Lovibond will also take advantage of the , ensuring effective risk management throughout the lifecycle of each matter. To streamline non-prescriptive work areas such as Employment and Matrimonial, the firm will adopt Proclaim’s Matter Management platform. Bird & Lovibond will further benefit from seamless digital dictation courtesy of Proclaim’s integration with BigHand.

David Trood, Partner at Bird & Lovibond, comments:

“It is crucial that we achieve our goal of staying ahead of the competition and strengthening our enviable reputation for outstanding client service. Proclaim will be fundamental to our success, providing a flexible single solution embraced by everyone at our 3 offices, guaranteeing a consistent approach for all our work areas. Efficiency will be transferred allowing us to take on more cases and spend less time on non-value adding tasks, freeing up more quality time for each client.”

 



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