Attwaters Jameson Hill replaces IRIS Aim with multi-year Peppermint deal

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11 December 2012


After 15 years using the IRIS Aim system, recently merged Attwaters Jameson Hill has signed a multi-year deal with Peppermint Technology. This will see the law firm move to Peppermint’s innovative legal service platform to support its growing legal business. Attwaters worked with Peppermint as an early partner and provided valuable input into application development and the migration process. Migration of the firm’s data to the Peppermint platform has already been successfully completed.

With a strong regional presence in Essex, Hertfordshire and London, Attwaters Jameson Hill also provides personal injury and medical negligence services across the UK.

The firm was particularly impressed with the platform’s built-in COFA and COLP functions and dashboards. This makes it easy for the firm to continually monitor and manage risk within the business and comply with the new outcome focused regulations.

Andrew Flannagan, managing partner at Attwaters Jameson Hill said, “In this changing legal environment we have a strong desire to grow and extend our services to clients. Our newly merged firm, supported by Peppermint’s innovative technology, will ensure we maintain traditional high standards while using technology to advance our client experience and improve our internal efficiency.”

Peppermint CEO, Arlene Adams, added, “Peppermint is fast becoming the preferred platform for growing and merging law firms. Many firms growing organically or through acquisition are turning to Peppermint for a single, firm-wide, technology platform based on a recognised industry standard, Microsoft Dynamics CRM. Our platform offers the very latest technology for a firm’s applications, content and data while delivering a highly flexible and scalable solution to support a growing and changing business.”



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