Ashtons Legal is the latest firm to adopt the award-winning toolbar Lexis Draft

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28 April 2016


LexisNexis200LexisNexis UK (www.lexisnexis.co.uk), a leading provider of content and technology solutions, today announced Ashtons Legal (Ashtons), an East Anglian-based law firm, is the latest business to adopt proofreading tool Lexis Draft.

Lexis Draft is a multi-award winning toolbar that automates proofreading and citation checking functions, saving time and ensuring document quality. The tool scans copy and highlights potential issues in agreements, finds and fixes inconsistent phrasing, identifies broken references, ensures that up-to-date citations are used, applies consistent numbering and allows for in-product collaboration.

Ashtons is dedicated to running a customer-centric and forward-thinking business. Using Lexis Draft to cut down on time spent on proofreading tasks will allow the firm to work smarter and focus on delivering first-class legal advice with exceptional service.

Maria Quirke, Head of Knowledge at Ashtons said: “We are always looking for ways to enhance our customer experience so to be able to save time drafting, checking and proofreading documents will in turn allow much more time for focusing on our clients’ needs.”

LexisNexis has partnered with Microsoft and Microsystems to create Lexis Draft. The collaboration provides advanced legal document automation and styling, citation checking and robust proofreading, all underpinned by leading LexisNexis content. All of these capabilities interact seamlessly within Microsoft Word, providing customers with a first-class user experience.

Julian Morgan, Head of Drafting Applications at LexisNexis, said: “Lexis Draft is fast being recognised as the technological way forward by progressive law firms. It offers significant time savings while also adding to the quality of legal documents. We are delighted that Ashtons can see the real customer value that Lexis Draft delivers.”

 



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