asb law joins other leading law firms on the Peppermint Platform

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17 July 2015


andrew clinton

Andrew Clinton, managing partner at asb law

asb law, based in Sussex and Kent, has signed up for the Legal Service Platform, the next generation legal software system from technology innovator, Peppermint Technology. The 150-strong law firm will replace its Lexis Nexis Axxia and Eclipse Proclaim systems in favour of the award-winning, Peppermint Platform.

Andrew Clinton, managing partner at asb law, commented on the deal,

“Following a thorough sweep of the legal technology market we concluded that the Peppermint Platform is best placed to enable us to achieve our strategic objectives. The single platform approach, and underlying Microsoft Dynamics platform, provides advantages and capabilities beyond those that alternative legacy providers could offer.”

The Legal Service Platform provides all the applications a law firm requires on one platform using a single source of data. The Peppermint Platform will facilitate enhanced client service levels and provide greater cost transparency for asb law. It will also greatly help staff to deliver a more cohesive and flexible service by maximising efficiencies, increasing collaboration across people and teams, providing insight to performance and enabling a co-ordinated approach to business development.

Clinton concludes,

“Building on modern, future-proof technology gives asb law a sustainable operating platform that can scale and adapt easily as our business requirements evolve.”



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