Advanced Legal announces portfolio wide solution for Client and Cost Management System

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2 January 2014


Leading software provider, l, today announces it will be launching a new claim utility solution, which allows clients to electronically submit claims to the Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) new Client and Cost Management System (CCMS).

The LAA is introducing CCMS as an online system designed to expedite the management of civil and family certificated legal aid cases. The claim utility solution will allow solicitors and barristers who use Advanced Legal’s solutions to submit claims electronically.  Almost all current forms relating to civil certificated work will eventually be replaced with digital transactions via the LAA CCMS portal.

Jitrenda Valera, Chief Marketing Officer, Advanced Legal says: “By integrating the new claim utility solution with CCMS, we are providing our clients with a tool that will significantly reduce the time they spend submitting forms to the LAA manually. This launch underlines our commitment to providing solutions that improve productivity and profitability.

“Advanced Legal continues to work closely with the LAA to develop an integrated solution for legal clients that will allow them to submit claims to the CCMS via an xml gateway. The new solution will enable users to save time, remove duplication and improve efficiency when submitting claim information.”

Advanced’s claim utility solution will be available for the majority of Advanced Legal Practice and Case Management and Chambers Management Systems and will be made available early in the new year once the testing with the LAA gateway is completed.

Advanced Legal forms part of Advanced Business Solutions, an Advanced Computer Software Group plc company.



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