Latest News

Lord Chief Justice “strongly opposes” accountants’ bid to handle litigation and advocacy work

Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd LCJ

The Lord Chief Justice has outlined his “strong opposition” to a bid to allow accountants to handle tax litigation and advocacy work – and in return come under fire from the body that would regulate them. Lord Thomas described the application by the Institute for Chartered Accountants in England and Wales as “entirely premature”.

February 21st, 2017

UK first as Ulster University launches legal innovation centre

Professor Paddy Nixon

Ulster University launched the UK’s first legal innovation centre last night, bringing together its law school, school of computing and intelligent systems, and global law firms Allen & Overy and Baker McKenzie. It aims to operate at the intersection between legal process innovation, technology and access to justice.

February 21st, 2017

Downward trend in conveyancing firms stopped in its tracks as work volumes rise

Mark Riddick Search Acumen chairman

The total number of law firms registering conveyancing transactions rose 4% in 2016 to 5,572, halting five years going the other way, and they are busier than before the financial crash, new figures have shown. However, the overall trend of active conveyancing firms has been steeply downwards in the last decade.

February 21st, 2017

Legal Futures Report

 

This Legal Futures roundtable report, published in association with LexisNexis, looks at what we call ‘the value proposition’ – how innovative firms have set upon a distinctive path and are ploughing them with vigour and success.

Legal Futures Blog

Rethinking ‘quality versus quantity’

Andrew Lloyd 2017

The ‘quality versus quantity’ discussion has been prevalent in conveyancing firms for as long as I can remember. Sacrifice one to achieve the other is the common perception – but should we really see these elements as mutually exclusive? According to the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, the UK lags behind the US and Germany by some 30 percentage points when it comes to productivity, meaning a German worker takes four days to produce what a British worker does in five.

February 15th, 2017